Spring-beauty (Claytonia caroliniana)
Deptford Pink (Dianthus armeria)
Herb Robert (Geranium robertianum)
 Plants of Lanark County, Ontario--2013 Edition
  by David J. White
Significant Areas
Rare and sparse native plants occur in all parts of the county. If one looks through the checklist; however, several locations appear quite frequently in the site lists for rare and sparse species. Some names, such as Watson Corners, appear often in the list because they occur in an area with few other towns or lakes so they represent a region more than a specific site. Other names appear frequently in the list because the areas are especially diverse or have a unique combination of geology, geography, and perhaps history that have combined to create conditions not found elsewhere in the county.

Places such as Dixon Lake or the Clay Bank alvar are considered special from a botanical point of view due to the large number of rare and sparse native plants found in a restricted area. Sites such as Dixon Lake occur on Public Land and as such can be accessed and freely explored. Other special areas, such as the Clay Bank alvar, are privately-owned but are at least partly accessible along roadsides where many of the significant plants can be seen.

The following 17 areas are considered to be the best examples of botanical diversity and rare plant concentrations in the county—plant ‘hot-spots’, if you like. As elsewhere in the county, the different levels of past effort can skew the perceived significance of one site over another. Further inventory in lesser-studied areas may show them to be more diverse than presently documented—or not. Several additional areas in the county are also botanically diverse (such as Numogate or Nolans Corners) but do not appear among the 17 areas chosen because there is no reasonable access to them.

Several of the example areas are large, little-disturbed natural landscapes (Dixon and Bottle Lakes; Lavant Long Lake). Most other areas; however, have seen significant disturbance and they are of interest more because of the many significant plants present, rather than because of any ‘wilderness experience’ one might get when visiting them. As with the Rare Plant Photos page, photos may be added to the descriptions below as time permits. The Significant Areas section is part of the 2013 version of the checklist and is included in the PDF file.
 

© David J. White 2013
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ALMONTE TOWN PARK
A small stream running through Almonte Town ParkIn the town of Almonte, on the east side of County Road 29 and the south side of Almonte Street (County Road 49), is a small public park that features mixed woods, rich seepage slopes, and wet meadows along a small creek. The lawns and trails are well-used by walkers and picnickers; however, the woods and slopes still support a relatively diverse flora in a rather small area.

Known only in Lanark from this site are: Carex woodii (Wood's Sedge) and Floerkea proserpinacoides (False Mermaid). Other rare plants include:  Astragalus neglectus (Cooper's Milk-vetch), Bidens vulgatus (Beggarticks), Carex bromoides (Brome-like Sedge), Carex hirtifolia (Hairy Sedge), Luzula acuminata (Acuminate Wood-rush), and Ranunculus hispidus var. caricetorum (Northern Crowfoot). There are also seven species rated as sparse known from this site.

BIG RIDEAU LAKE
The north shore of this large lake consists of a rugged Canadian Shield landscape associated with the Rideau River—a major plant and animal migration corridor. The area's location in the extreme south tip of the county and southern North Burgess Township, puts it within range of several more-typically southern species. Aquatic vegetation is diverse in the lake though several invasive species are very well-established and may threaten this diversity in the future.

It is all private land; however, there is access to parts of it along the Rideau Trail and Big Rideau North Shore Road. The rugged shoreline itself is quite accessible by boat and several significant species are common on open rocky slopes near shore. Public boat launches exist at Murphys Point Provincial Park and at Narrows Lock at the west end of Big Rideau Lake on Narrows Lock Road. Murphys Point Provincial Park occurs within this broad area but it is treated separately below.

Found nowhere else in the county is Carex muehlenbergii (Muhlenberg's Sedge). Other rare species include: Carex sparganioides (Bur-reed Sedge), Carya ovata (Shagbark Hickory), Claytonia virginica (Virginian Spring-beauty), Polygonum douglasii (Douglas' Knotweed), Potentilla arguta (Tall Cinquefoil), Pseudognaphalium obtusifolium (Sweet Everlasting), and Stuckenia filiformis (Threadleaf Pondweed). There are also 14 species rated as sparse that are known from this site.

BLUEBERRY MOUNTAIN
Blueberry Mountain is the local name given to a high ridge near the northwest corner of the county in northern Lavant Township. The panoramic view from this hilltop is unmatched in the county. The ridge is part of a large, diverse, and undeveloped property that is home to the former Alba Wilderness School. In 2008, the property was voted "one of the Seven Wonders of the County". This area has become the first property to be protected under a conservation easement with the Mississippi Madawaska Land Trust Conservancy. With the agreement, this forested tract will be allowed to develop naturally and to be enjoyed by the public for the next 1000 years. Blueberry Mountain can be found on Hills of Peace Road, east of Flower Station. See Howard Clifford's new website (cliffLAND) for more information.

The property has been little-explored botanically, compared to many of the other areas highlighted in this section. Potamogeton spirillus (Northern Snailseed Pondweed) and Salix eriocephala (Missouri Willow) are known in the county only from this site. Other rare plants include: Carex scabrata (Rough Sedge), Eriophorum tenellum (Filiform Cotton-grass), and Platanthera orbiculata (Round-leaved Orchid). There are also eight species rated as sparse known from this site. No doubt, further exploration of this area will add to the list of significant species.

BOLINGBROKE/BOBS LAKEA dry forest opening near Bolingbroke, dominated by Woodland Sunflower (Helianthus divaricatus).
The southwest corner of Lanark County includes a small portion of Bobs Lake near its outflow to the Tay River. As with Big Rideau Lake, the Bobs Lake area's location, in the extreme southwest corner of the county and South Sherbrooke Township, puts it within range of several more-typically southern species. The open, dry deciduous woods north of Bolingbroke and the aquatic communities of the lake harbour a number of such species which do not occur farther north in the county.

It is all private land; however, there is access to parts of it along Bolingbroke Station Road. Bobs Lake shoreline and islands are quite accessible by canoe or kayak and several of the significant upland species occur near shore. Aquatic vegetation is diverse in this end of the lake. A boat launch is available at Cedar Haven Cottages on Bobs Lake in adjacent Frontenac County.

Found nowhere else in the county is Littorella americana (Shore-plantain) which is locally common along several parts of the Bobs Lake shoreline. Other rare aquatic and lakeshore species include: Callitriche hermaphroditica (Water-starwort),  Isoetes macrospora (Quillwort), Potamogeton vaseyi (Vasey's Pondweed), and Salix exigua ssp. interior (Sandbar Willow).

In the dry woods, one can find such rarities as: Asclepias exaltata (Poke Milkweed),  Carex sparganioides (Bur-reed Sedge), Desmodium paniculatum (Panicled Tick-trefoil), Elymus villosus (Hairy Wild Rye), Fallopia scandens (False Buckwheat), Lysimachia quadrifolia (Whorled Loosestrife), Poa alsodes (Woodland Poa), Smilax herbacea (Carrion-flower), and Triodanis perfoliata (Venus' Looking-glass). The provincially rare Wolffia brasiliensis (Watermeal) was found in a small beaver pond. There are also 18 species rated as sparse known from this site.

BURNT LANDS ALVAR
A moist alvar meadow dominated by the provincially rare Prairie Dropseed (Sporobolus heterolepis)The Burnt Lands alvar is a provincially significant Area of Natural and Scientific Interest (ANSI) that straddles the Lanark/Ottawa boundary (Golden Line Road) in eastern Ramsay Township. The Crown Land portion of the alvar is regulated as a Nature Reserve Class provincial park. Alvars are areas of thin soil over flat-lying limestone bedrock. They are drought-prone in summer but may be seasonally-inundated in spring due to poor drainage. The site contains a diversity of coniferous forest, dry and moist alvar meadows, and areas of open exposed bedrock. Such site diversity and extreme conditions favour a number of specialized and otherwise rare plants. The Burnt Lands—as its name implies—is quite susceptible to forest fires in especially dry summers. An extensive forest fire swept through the area in 1870. A smaller but much more recent fire occurred along Golden Line Road in 1999. Forests in the Burnt Lands are severely damaged by fire due to the dry, thin soil and the trees are very slow to regenerate compared to those in areas with deeper, moister soil.

The Lanark County portion of the alvar is mostly private land; however, there is a large block of Public Land beyond the travelled portion of the east side of Ramsay Concession 12. There is also some access along township roads, such as Golden Line Road, and along unused road allowances, such as the north ends of Ramsay Concessions 11A and 12. On the Ottawa side of Golden Line Road, a large area along the south side of March Road (County Road 49) is owned by the City of Ottawa and this area is quite accessible.

This site has been well explored over the years and many significant species have been recorded. Found nowhere else in the county are Ceanothus herbaceus (Narrow-leaved New Jersey Tea), Cirsium discolor (Prairie Thistle) (also provincially rare), Crataegus macracantha (Downy Hawthorn), and Eragrostis frankii (Frank's Love Grass). Two other provincially and county-wide rare plants occur here, Astragalus neglectus (Cooper's Milk-vetch) and Sporobolus heterolepis (Prairie Dropseed).

Many other rare-in-Lanark County plants are known from the Burnt Lands: Amelanchier spicata (Shadbush), Arabis hirsuta ssp. pycnocarpa (Hairy Rock Cress), Calystegia spithamaea (Upright Bindweed), Carex crawei (Crawe's Sedge), Carex richardsonii (Richardson's Sedge), Carex umbellata (Umbel-like Sedge), Diphasiastrum complanatum (Ground-cedar), Dracocephalum parviflorum (Dragon-head), Equisetum Xmackaii (Hybrid Horsetail), Halenia deflexa (Spurred-gentian), Maianthemum canadense var. interius (Hairy Wild Lily-of-the-valley), Panicum flexile (Wiry Panic Grass), Pilea fontana (Clearweed), Polygala senega (Seneca Snakeroot), Scutellaria parvula (Small Skullcap), Solidago ptarmicoides (Upland White Goldenrod), Veronica peregrina ssp. xalapensis (Purslane Speedwell), and Viola nephrophylla (Northern Bog Violet). There are also 30 species rated as sparse known from this site.

CHRISTIE LAKE
Shoreline deciduous swamp and dry, rocky meadows at the west end of Christie LakeIn the southern portion of the county, the west end of Christie Lake and the adjacent Tay River support extensive areas of diverse marsh and aquatic communities. The rocky shoreline and small islands of this end of the lake also support a diverse flora due to the mix of igneous and marble bedrock present. Elevated rock barren meadows and dry woodland on the north side of the west end of the lake also contain many rare plants. These features have contributed to the area being identified as a Candidate ANSI.

The area is easily accessed by canoe or kayak into the Tay River from a South Sherbrooke Township access lane on Hanna Road, about 500m east of Bolingbroke Road. The rock barren meadows and dry woodland overlooking the west end of the lake are easily seen from the water but are not very accessible.

Found nowhere else in the county are Bouteloua curtipendula (Side-oats Grama), Gentianella quinquefolia (Stiff Gentian), and Sorghastrum nutans (Indian Grass). The Side-oats Grama and Stiff Gentian are both provincially rare. Other rare aquatic and lakeshore species include: Callitriche hermaphroditica (Water-starwort), Myriophyllum heterophyllum (Diverse-leaved Water-milfoil), Potamogeton foliosus (Leafy Pondweed), and Wolffia brasiliensis (Watermeal) (also provincially rare).

The rock barren meadows and dry woodland support such rare species as: Amelanchier arborea (Juneberry), Amelanchier spicata (Shadbush), Arabis holboellii (Rock Cress), Asplenium platyneuron (Ebony Spleenwort), Carex siccata (Copper Sedge), Desmodium paniculatum (Panicled Tick-trefoil), Hieracium umbellatum (Kalm's Hawkweed), Solidago ptarmicoides (Upland White Goldenrod), Triodanis perfoliata (Venus' Looking-glass), and Viola sagittata var. ovata (Northern Downy Violet).

There are historic records of the rare Potamogeton vaseyi (Vasey's Pondweed) (1973) and Salix nigra (Black Willow) (1966). There are also 21 species rated as sparse known from this site. An additional sparse plant is known from an historic record.

CLAY BANK ALVAR
Alvar meadow at Clay BankThe Clay Bank alvar occurs near the north tip of the county in Pakenham Township and straddles the border with Renfrew County along Young and Barrie Roads. The Clay Bank alvar, the Panmure alvar, and the Burnt Lands alvar have many rare and sparse plants in common but each supports at least a few plants not found in the others. This alvar is all on private land; however, there is access to much of the flora of the area along township roads (Young, Barrie, and the 10th and 11th Concessions North Pakenham).

Found at Clay Bank but nowhere else in the County is Ranunculus fascicularis (Early Buttercup). Two rare alvar species from this area are also provincially rare: Astragalus neglectus (Cooper's Milk-vetch) and Sporobolus heterolepis (Prairie Dropseed). Other rare plants include: Carex crawei (Crawe's Sedge), Carex richardsonii (Richardson's Sedge), Carex umbellata (Umbel-like Sedge), Luzula acuminata (Acuminate Wood-rush), Panicum flexile (Wiry Panic Grass), Polygala senega (Seneca Snakeroot), and Scutellaria parvula (Small Skullcap). There is an historic record (1940) of the rare Symphyotrichum oolentangiense (Azure Aster) from the alvar. There are also 11 species rated as sparse known from this site.

DIXON AND BOTTLE LAKESThe floating poor fen communities at Dixon Lake
These two small lakes occur near the northwest corner of the county in southwest Lavant Township. Both lakes occur in an area of acidic igneous bedrock that includes several poor fens, and boggy ponds and lakeshores.

The general area is little-developed and supports a wide range of forest communities, some of which are moderately-mature and have seen little recent cutting. North of Bottle Lake are extensive granite barrens that provide panoramic views of the wild countryside. Portions of these barrens have been considerably disturbed by ATV use.

The majority of the site is Public Land so it can be freely explored. The appropriately-named Bottle Lake Road, that goes into Bottle Lake, is usually navigable with a car; however, the side road in to Dixon Lake generally requires a 4X4 vehicle (or a 2 km hike). Both small lakes have canoe and kayak access points and this is the best way to explore their boggy shores and many of the floating poor fen communities. A combination of geology, site history, and geographic location have combined to allow the area to support many locally rare plants.

Granite barrens north of Bottle Lake.Four rare plants are known within the county only from this location: Oclemena nemoralis (Bog Aster), Utricularia purpurea (Purple Bladderwort), Utricularia resupinata (Inverted Bladderwort), and Viola lanceolata (Lance-leaved Violet).

Other rare species in this area include: Carex brunnescens (Brownish Sedge), Carex oligosperma (Few-seeded Sedge), Drosera intermedia (Spatulate-leaved Sundew), Eleocharis flavescens var. olivacea (Olive-brown Spike-rush), Eriocaulon aquaticum (Pipewort), Eriophorum tenellum (Filiform Cotton-grass), Gratiola neglecta (Hedge-hyssop), Hypericum ellipticum (Pale St. John's-wort), Juncus pelocarpus (Brown-fruited Rush), Lycopodiella inundata (Bog Club-moss), Oclemena acuminata (Whorled Wood Aster), Platanthera clavellata (Club-spur Orchid), Triadenum virginicum (Virginia St. John's-wort), Utricularia cornuta (Horned Bladderwort), and Utricularia gibba (Humped Bladderwort). There are also 29 species rated as sparse known from this site. 

LAVANT LONG LAKERocky coniferous forest at Perch Lake
A large block of Public Land occurs in the northwest corner of the county in Lavant Township. The area around Lavant Long Lake, and adjacent Perch and Dobbie Lakes, is virtually undeveloped and supports a diverse range of forests, wetlands, and shorelines. Selective logging is ongoing in some of the area but there are extensive stands that have seen little recent disturbance. Old logging roads provide access into much of this wild area; however, some of the wetter trails have been extensively damaged by ATV and 4X4 travel. Paddling the varied and virtually pristine shoreline of Lavant Long Lake is a very enjoyable daytrip, although getting a canoe or kayak into the lake is a challenge.

Carex merritt-fernaldii (Sedge) is known in the county only from this area. Other rare species include: Coeloglossum viride (Bracted Orchid), Cryptogramma stelleri (Slender Cliffbrake), Gratiola neglecta (Hedge-hyssop), Hypericum ellipticum (Pale St. John's-wort), Lycopodium obscurum (Ground-pine), Pellaea atropurpurea (Purple-stemmed Cliffbrake) (also provincially rare), Platanthera orbiculata (Round-leaved Orchid), Potamogeton foliosus (Leafy Pondweed), Potamogeton strictifolius (Strict-leaved Pondweed), Pseudognaphalium obtusifolium (Sweet Everlasting), Rorippa palustris ssp. fernaldiana (Yellow Cress), Uvularia sessilifolia (Sessile-leaved Bellwort), and Viola sagittata var. ovata (Northern Downy Violet). There are also 26 species rated as sparse known from this site.

LOWNEY LAKE
Open fen at the north end of Lowney Lake.This small lake occurs in northeast Darling Township in an area of marble bedrock. This calcareous substrate has contributed to the development of an extensive graminoid fen at the north end of the lake. Smaller fen and swamp communities occur around the south end as well. Most of the west and south sides of the lake are Public Land and this upland area supports diverse coniferous and mixed forests. The north and east sides of the lake are private but the north end fen and shorelines can be accessed from the lake using an unmarked lane that goes into a little-used boat launch (suitable only for canoes and kayaks) on Peneshula Road about 900m south of the bridge at the lake's north end. The lake’s wetlands are part of the provincially significant White Lake Wetland Complex.

Rare plants from this area include: Galium tinctorium (Dyer's Bedstraw), Goodyera tesselata (Checkered Rattlesnake-plantain), Platanthera dilatata (White Bog Orchid), Pterospora andromedea (Pinedrops) (also provincially rare), Spiranthes romanzoffiana (Hooded Ladies'-tresses), and Triglochin maritimum (Arrow-grass). There are also 15 species rated as sparse known from this site. Two additional sparse plants are known from historic records.

MISSISSIPPI RIVER
Rock-strewn rapids of the Mississippi River near PlayfairvilleThe Mississippi River passes through many kilometres of Lanark countryside as it travels from Stump and Dalhousie Lakes in the west, across to Mississippi Lake in the east-central part of the county, and finally out past Pakenham near the northeast corner. The shoreline of this large river is of interest along much of its length; however, two sections stand out from a plant diversity perspective: the first section of interest includes the east end of Dalhousie Lake and the swamp- and marsh-lined portion of the Mississippi River from the lake almost to Sheridans Rapids in Dalhousie Township. Aquatic and shoreline communities are quite diverse at the east end of the lake, along the river, and in two shallow associated lakes (Purdons and McCullochs Mud Lakes) found halfway between Dalhousie Lake and Sheridans Rapids. These shallow lakes and adjacent river make up the provincially significant McCullochs Mud Lake Wetland.

The river below Dalhousie Lake is easily explored by kayak or canoe, and a boat launch exists at Sylvania Lodge at the foot of the lake. The river is quite slow-moving until it reaches Sheridans Rapids so paddling both ways in this section is relatively easy.

Rare plants in this area include: Cyperus esculentus var. leptostachyus (Ground-almond), Eleocharis flavescens var. olivacea (Olive-brown Spike-rush), Isoetes macrospora (Quillwort), Salix exigua ssp. interior (Sandbar Willow), Spartina pectinata (Tall Cord Grass), and Symphyotrichum ontarione (Ontario Aster).

The second portion of interest is the rocky, rapid-filled section of the river from Sheridans Rapids down to just past Playfairville in northeast Bathurst Township. After Sheridans Rapids, the river moves along more quickly, paddling becomes more challenging, and the trip becomes a one-way excursion. This section is popular with whitewater canoeists in early spring when the river volumes are high. Late in summer, several stretches below Sheridans Rapids can become too shallow for paddling, but portages exist at most of the rapids. The main boat access point for the lower section is at the two-part bridge on Sheridans Rapids Road.

Rare plants in this area include: Parnassia glauca (Grass-of-parnassus), Pilea fontana (Clearweed), Platanthera flava var. herbiola (Tubercled Orchid) (also provincially rare), Spiranthes lucida (Shining Ladies'-tresses), Torreyochloa pallida var. fernaldii (Fernald's Manna Grass), and Triglochin maritimum (Arrow-grass). There are also 19 species rated as sparse known from this site overall. An additional sparse plant is known from an historic record.

MURPHYS POINT PROVINCIAL PARK
This large park occurs along the north shore of Big Rideau Lake in the south part of the county along the southern edge of North Burgess Township. It protects an extensive and diverse range of forest, wetland, and shoreline communities in an area of primarily acidic, igneous bedrock. The area's location in the southern tip of the county puts it within range of several rare and typically more-southern species. Murphys Point occurs along the Rideau River system—a major migration corridor.

Being a provincial park, it can be freely explored and has an extensive trail network. A kayak or canoe is an excellent way to explore the rocky shoreline and diverse aquatic communities in the park. A sheltered boat launch occurs in the park at the mouth of Hoggs Bay.

The park has been well-studied over the years and many rare plants have been reported from it. Unknown elsewhere in Lanark County are: Carex atlantica (Prickly Bog Sedge) (also provincially rare), Carex tribuloides (Blunt-broom Sedge), and Luzula multiflora (Common Wood-rush). Other rare plants in the park include: Amelanchier arborea (Juneberry), Arabis hirsuta ssp. pycnocarpa (Hairy Rock Cress), Carex brunnescens (Brownish Sedge), Carex formosa (Sedge), Carex hirtifolia (Hairy Sedge), Carex prasina (Onion-coloured Sedge), Carex siccata (Copper Sedge), Carya ovata (Shagbark Hickory), Claytonia virginica (Virginian Spring-beauty), Clematis occidentalis (Purple Clematis), Cyperus strigosus (Strigose Cyperus), Luzula acuminata (Acuminate Wood-rush), Panax trifolius (Dwarf Ginseng), Persicaria hydropiperoides (False Water-pepper), Potamogeton foliosus (Leafy Pondweed), Vaccinium corymbosum (High Bush Blueberry), and Woodwardia virginica (Virginia Chain Fern).

There are historic records (not recorded since 1974) of: Anemone quinquefolia (Wood Anemone), Calamagrostis stricta ssp. inexpansa (Northern Reed Grass), Desmodium nudiflorum (Naked-flowered Tick-trefoil), Epilobium coloratum (Purple-leaved Willow-herb), Galium boreale (Northern Bedstraw), Myosotis laxa (Smaller Forget-me-not), Neobeckia aquatica (Lake Cress), Oclemena acuminata (Whorled Wood Aster), Osmorhiza longistylis (Anise-root), Potamogeton ogdenii (Ogden's Pondweed) (also provincially rare), Potamogeton strictifolius (Strict-leaved Pondweed), Prenanthes alba (White-lettuce), Ranunculus gmelinii (Yellow Water-crowfoot), Salix nigra (Black Willow), and Torreyochloa pallida var. fernaldii (Fernald's Manna Grass). There are also 23 species rated as sparse known from this site. An additional 11 sparse plants are known from historic records.

NAPIER LAKE
Aquamarine-coloured water in a small lake near Napier LakeThis lake, and several nearby small unnamed lakes, occurs in an extensive glacial moraine deposit in northwest Darling Township. Much of this underlying moraine is calcareous in nature which provides unusual groundwater conditions and may help to explain the rather large number of rare species known from this area. These features have contributed to the area being identified as the provincially significant Darling Township Forest ANSI.

The area consists of a mix of private land and Public Land so parts of it can be freely explored. Much of the private land is unfenced and has been unposted so it too can be hiked. The forests have seen extensive cutting at various times in the past but the lakes and kettle ponds are essentially undisturbed and this is where most of the interesting species are to be found. Campbells Road west of County Road 511 provides the best access to the site and the easternmost km or so goes through Public Land.

The area has been well-studied over the years and many rare plants have been reported from it. Unknown elsewhere in Lanark County are: Carex prairea (Prairie Sedge), Eleocharis quinqueflora (Spike-rush), and Primula mistassinica (Bird's-eye Primrose). Other rare plants in the area include: Amelanchier arborea (Juneberry), Carex crawei (Crawe's Sedge), Carex lurida (Sallow Sedge), Carex scabrata (Rough Sedge), Carex sterilis (Sedge), Clematis occidentalis (Purple Clematis), Coeloglossum viride (Bracted Orchid), Diphasiastrum complanatum (Ground-cedar), Dryopteris Xboottii (Boott's Wood Fern), Eleocharis intermedia (Intermediate Spike-rush), Epilobium palustre (Swamp Willow-herb), Equisetum Xmackaii (Hybrid Horsetail), Fallopia scandens (False Buckwheat), Lycopodiella inundata (Bog Club-moss), Lycopodium obscurum (Ground-pine), Ophioglossum pusillum (Adder's-tongue Fern), Pterospora andromedea (Pinedrops) (also provincially rare), Rhynchospora capillacea (Beak-rush), Stellaria longifolia (Long-leaved Chickweed), and Uvularia sessilifolia (Sessile-leaved Bellwort). There are also 38 species rated as sparse known from this site.

PANMURE ALVAR
Panmure alvar occurs about 4 kilometres southeast of Pakenham in eastern Pakenham Township and straddles the Lanark County/Ottawa boundary. It is not far from and is part of the same formation as the Burnt Lands alvar. The site is private but there is some access at the south end from the Rock Coady Road allowance that goes north from Panmure Road. The alvar consists of an elevated limestone plateau with scanty soil. It is a mix of open coniferous woods, dry to moist grassy alvar meadows, and areas of bare exposed bedrock. These features contributed to the area being identified as a Candidate ANSI.

Rare plants in this area include: Arabis hirsuta ssp. pycnocarpa (Hairy Rock Cress), Astragalus neglectus (Cooper's Milk-vetch) (also provincially rare), Calystegia spithamaea (Upright Bindweed), Carex crawei (Crawe's Sedge), Carex richardsonii (Richardson's Sedge), Carex umbellata (Umbel-like Sedge), Maianthemum canadense var. interius (Hairy Wild Lily-of-the-valley), Polygala senega (Seneca Snakeroot), Scutellaria parvula (Small Skullcap), and Veronica peregrina ssp. xalapensis (Purslane Speedwell). There are also nine species rated as sparse known from this site.

PINERY ROAD EAST
Dry, impoverished, alvar-like meadows near Pinery Road.A dry alvar-like area occurs in the northeast part of Montague Township. Although it doesn't have the diversity and overall significance of the Burnt Lands or Panmure alvars, it is still an interesting area and it supports several significant species not found at the Burnt Lands or Panmure. The area is all private land but there is good access to much of its interesting flora along the east end of Pinery Road, the northern portion of Montague Boundary Road, and Ellen Maloney Road.

Not known elsewhere in the county is Lobelia spicata (Pale Spike Lobelia). Other rare plants in the area include: Panicum flexile (Wiry Panic Grass), Potentilla arguta (Tall Cinquefoil), Solidago ptarmicoides (Upland White Goldenrod), and Verbena simplex (Narrow-leaved Vervain). There are also 20 species rated as sparse known from this site. One additional sparse plant is known from an historic record.

PURDON CONSERVATION AREA
The popular boardwalk through the Showy Lady-slipper colony at Purdon.This diverse fen, located in central Dalhousie Township, is managed by Mississippi Valley Conservation whose focus is to protect and enhance the very large population of Cypripedium reginae (Showy Lady-slipper) and to provide easy access to the fen for visitors. The boardwalks and trails do give very good access to this special place but it can be very busy when the Showy Lady-slippers bloom in the latter half of June.

This is another area that has been well-studied over the years and a number of rare plants have been found there, although no Lanark plant is known only from the site. Rare plants in this area include: Amelanchier arborea (Juneberry), Carex bromoides (Brome-like Sedge), Carex brunnescens (Brownish Sedge), Carex chordorrhiza (Cord Sedge), Carex livida (Lead-coloured Sedge), Lycopodiella inundata (Bog Club-moss), Moehringia lateriflora (Grove Sandwort), Platanthera dilatata (White Bog Orchid), Platanthera orbiculata (Round-leaved Orchid), Potentilla arguta (Tall Cinquefoil), Uvularia sessilifolia (Sessile-leaved Bellwort), and Viola nephrophylla (Northern Bog Violet). There are also 14 species rated as sparse known from this site.

ROBERTSON LAKE
A floating poor-fen community at Robertson LakeThis medium-sized lake in Lavant Township has several features of interest: diverse aquatics, numerous rocky islands, and areas of poor fen communities. Boat access exists at the northeast end of the lake at the community picnic area. The poor fen communities occur along the west side of the lake but are best accessed on foot from either side of a large culvert on the South Lavant Road just after Morrison Lane, about 1.5 kilometres west of the picnic area. The poor fen in this area, west of the cottages, is on Public Land and it can be explored freely.

Elodea nuttallii (Water-weed) and Muhlenbergia uniflora (One-flowered Muhlenbergia) are known in the county only from this site. Other rare plants include: Arethusa bulbosa (Dragon's-mouth), Drosera intermedia (Spatulate-leaved Sundew), Eleocharis flavescens var. olivacea (Olive-brown Spike-rush), Platanthera clavellata (Club-spur Orchid), and Potamogeton strictifolius (Strict-leaved Pondweed). There are also ten species rated as sparse known from this site. Two additional sparse plants are known from historic records.